Declines in large old trees

Woodland Matters

Research from Spain and Sweden in Europe, Brazil, Australia, California and many other parts of the world, provides grim evidence of massive declines of some of the largest organisms on earth – old trees (Lindenmayer et all, Science vol 338 7 December 2012). If populations continue to collapse, as predicted, with them will also disappear the ecological, historic and landscape roles of these keystone structures that cannot be provided by younger trees. John Muir, founding figure of the conservation movement in the USA and a passionate advocate for the giant redwoods of Yosemite National Park (population decline of 24% between the 1930s and 1990s) is no doubt turning in his grave.

Why are large old trees disappearing? As individual trees they are exceptionally vulnerable to a wide range of impacts – intentional removal, new pests and diseases, root compaction and damage, fire and competition – to name a few…

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About argylesock

I wrote a PhD about veterinary parasitology so that's the starting point for this blog. But I'm now branching out into other areas of biology and into popular science writing. I'll write here about science that happens in landscapes, particularly farmland, and about science involving interspecific interactions. Datasets and statistics get my attention. Exactly where this blog will lead? That's a journey that I'm on and I hope you'll come with me.
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