Not enough cereals to feed the world

Global Food Security (GFS) says that cereal production needs to increase by 50% between 2000 and 2030.

There are real experts at GFS so I won’t try to speak for them. I will say that the final section of the piece I’ve just linked to catches my eye. That section is about food waste. We’ve talked here about post-retail food waste in rich countries. It’s not simple, of course. But I think the issue of wasted food needs more attention. Food security is for life, not just for Christmas.

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About argylesock

I wrote a PhD about veterinary parasitology so that's the starting point for this blog. But I'm now branching out into other areas of biology and into popular science writing. I'll write here about science that happens in landscapes, particularly farmland, and about science involving interspecific interactions. Datasets and statistics get my attention. Exactly where this blog will lead? That's a journey that I'm on and I hope you'll come with me.
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3 Responses to Not enough cereals to feed the world

  1. Finn Holding says:

    This is really scary stuff… but the preferred solutions always appear to technological (which, coincidentally or not, will generate collosal incomes for the providers, and the more hungry people get the bigger the profits wil be), and never about managing food production and supply and preventing waste in a sustainable fashion. Now why is that…?

  2. Pingback: Remember the forgotten crops | Science on the Land

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