5,000 years ago, before the domestication of rice, ancient Chinese got starch from palms…

anthropogen

From Science World Report:

China wasn’t known for its agriculture until domesticated rice was introduced. Yet now, archaeologists have made an intriguing find. They’ve discovered that people in subtropical China may have practiced agriculture 5,000 years ago–long before the arrival of rice in the region.

Rice cultivation in southern China began after domesticated strains arrived along the Lower Yangtze River. Until now, researchers believed that this event is what sparked the beginning of formal agriculture in the area. Yet poor organic preservation in the study region meant that traditional archaeobotany techniques weren’t possible, and left many questions about the history of these people.

In order to find out a little bit more about the region and the advent of agriculture, the researchers employed a new technique–ancient starch analysis. With this new method, they examined grinding stones from the era, pulling small quantities of sediment from the tiny pits and cracks…

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About argylesock

I wrote a PhD about veterinary parasitology so that's the starting point for this blog. But I'm now branching out into other areas of biology and into popular science writing. I'll write here about science that happens in landscapes, particularly farmland, and about science involving interspecific interactions. Datasets and statistics get my attention. Exactly where this blog will lead? That's a journey that I'm on and I hope you'll come with me.
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