How a giant tree’s death sparked the conservation movement 160 years ago

argylesock says… Here’s the story of how a giant sequoia (Sequoiadendron giganteum) inspired people to start thinking differently about the natural world. The ‘Mammoth Tree’ died but it didn’t die in vain.

LEARN FROM NATURE

Today marks the 160th anniversary of a seminal, but largely forgotten moment in the history of the conservation movement. The Guardian’s Leo Hickman reports

On Monday, 27 June, 1853, a giant sequoia – one of the natural world’s most awe-inspiring sights – was brought to the ground by a band of gold-rush speculators in Calaveras county, California. It had taken the men three weeks to cut through the base of the 300ft-tall, 1,244-year-old tree, but finally it fell to the forest floor.

A section of the bark from the “Mammoth Tree”, as newspapers soon described it, had already been removed and was sent to San Francisco to be put on display. The species had only been “discovered” (local Native American tribes such as the Miwok had known of the trees for centuries) that spring by a hunter who stumbled upon the pristine grove in the foothills of the Sierra…

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About argylesock

I wrote a PhD about veterinary parasitology so that's the starting point for this blog. But I'm now branching out into other areas of biology and into popular science writing. I'll write here about science that happens in landscapes, particularly farmland, and about science involving interspecific interactions. Datasets and statistics get my attention. Exactly where this blog will lead? That's a journey that I'm on and I hope you'll come with me.
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