Food security in our hungry world

The Global Food Security Index (GFSI) ‘measures the risks and factors that drive food security’ including affordability, availability, quality and safety.

GFSI is sponsored by the technology giant DuPont. So this is the world of making money. And there’s important science being done there. It’s the world of making money but money is for people. This hungry world needs and intends to feed people.

This week, the Economist Intelligence Unit (EIU) tells us of a GFSI report saying that the world’s doing no better, but no worse, for food security than it was a year ago. To read the EIU’s words, you’ll need to register on their site. They don’t ask you to pay anything but just now, I’m not registered there. Are you?

Instead, here are a world map and an interactive graph of the current GFSI data. The graph plots GFSI against how much households spend on food. If you find your own country on the graph, you can hover your mouse to see more detail.

It seems that here in Britain, our food security is close to Israel’s and Spain’s, lower than our neighbours’ food security in France and Germany but higher than our other neighbours’ food security in Italy. Like those countries, we’re spending about 1/5 of our household income on food. The lowest food security is in the Democratic Republic of Congo, where households spend nearly 3/4 of their income on food. The highest food security is in the United States of America, where households spend less than 1/5 of their income on food.

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About argylesock

I wrote a PhD about veterinary parasitology so that's the starting point for this blog. But I'm now branching out into other areas of biology and into popular science writing. I'll write here about science that happens in landscapes, particularly farmland, and about science involving interspecific interactions. Datasets and statistics get my attention. Exactly where this blog will lead? That's a journey that I'm on and I hope you'll come with me.
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