How Monsanto Is Terrifying the Farming World

argylesock says… Here are strong words against the biotech giant Monsanto, ‘a pesticide company that’s bought up seed firms.’ I can’t vouch for the accuracy of this article, but it’s well worth reading. I notice one error. The two GM crops licenced for cultivation in parts of the European Union are a maize (corn) called MON810 for food and livestock feed, and a potato called Amflora for making paper and yarn. MON810 is being grown but Amflora was a commercial failure. MON810 is by Monsanto but Amflora isn’t – it’s by BASF. [Edit] My mistake. Amflora was withdrawn by BASF, who made it, for legal reasons not commercial reasons. You can follow the pingback below, to my post about Amflora.

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About argylesock

I wrote a PhD about veterinary parasitology so that's the starting point for this blog. But I'm now branching out into other areas of biology and into popular science writing. I'll write here about science that happens in landscapes, particularly farmland, and about science involving interspecific interactions. Datasets and statistics get my attention. Exactly where this blog will lead? That's a journey that I'm on and I hope you'll come with me.
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3 Responses to How Monsanto Is Terrifying the Farming World

  1. Finn says:

    This is a very interesting article Sam. It looks like Monsanto has managed to place minions into every facet of the government apparatus that can impinge on its operations. It’s not a good position for a government to be in. But it looks like the farming community is fighting back.

    • argylesock says:

      Yes. This article contains at least one factual error, as I mentioned, therefore I’m wary of believing everything it says. But as I learn more about GM, I’m thinking about politics as well as thinking about science.

  2. Pingback: A GM potato for Europe? | Science on the Land

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