Insects could be the future of food

In many cultures, insects are delicacies. Mostly people are eating beetles (Coleoptera) and caterpillars (Lepidoptera). People also eat bees, wasps and ants (Hymenoptera), cicadas (Hemiptera), locusts and crickets (Orthoptera), dragonflies (Odonata) and flies (Diptera).

Eating insects is called entomophagy. Those of us who feel disgusted at the thought of it should think again, says Khalil A. Cassimally at Scitable. He explains why he believes that entomophagy is the future of food.

Here’s an article from Auntie Beeb about entomophagy. Some edible insects are harvested from their wild populations (foraging). Others can be farmed (entomoculture).

I’m now wondering whether I’ll write a series of entomofoodie posts for this blog. ‘Edible Insect of the Month’ could be interesting, couldn’t it? Or ‘Insect Bite of the Month.’ You could tell me which edible insects are available where you live and how that changes with the seasons.

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About argylesock

I wrote a PhD about veterinary parasitology so that's the starting point for this blog. But I'm now branching out into other areas of biology and into popular science writing. I'll write here about science that happens in landscapes, particularly farmland, and about science involving interspecific interactions. Datasets and statistics get my attention. Exactly where this blog will lead? That's a journey that I'm on and I hope you'll come with me.
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6 Responses to Insects could be the future of food

  1. Littlesundog says:

    Good heavens, I have no idea what insects are edible or plentiful in our area of the US. I would be fascinated to know what insects in the woodlands I could forage though. Just like the fungal “morel” mushrooms that we hunt in the springtime, I would be inclined to try eating them (in cooking… not so sure about just popping one in my mouth raw!) if I knew more about them. This is an interesting post! I would love to hear more!

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