Trade between Europe and the United States

Do you think the Transatlantic Trade and Investment Partnership (TTIP) will make the world a better place? Perhaps it will. It’s certainly going to affect us. The European Commission (EC) calls this ‘The biggest trade deal in the world’.

Here’s a summary of how the TTIP came to be negotiated. The agreement’s not yet in place and the negotiations are quite secretive.

The not-for-profit GRAIN tells us what’s being discussed about trade between Europe and the United States (US). As you know, we’re invited to join a ‘webinar’ the day after tomorrow to comment on this topic.

I like GRAIN’s summary of what the TTIP could mean. They say, ‘It is all about reducing the hoops for agribusiness. Not only would this hurt Europeans, whose clearly higher standards would be dragged down, but it would affect many other countries’ food producers and consumers, since any deal reached between Washington and Brussels will set a new international benchmark. From genetically modified organisms (GMOs) to bisphenol A (BPA), the need to protect people from the industrial food system, not open the gates for it to spread, is more urgent than ever.’

The proposed TTIP isn’t just about food safety. It’s also about the land and the sea. You might choose to follow the links from this EC article.

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About argylesock

I wrote a PhD about veterinary parasitology so that's the starting point for this blog. But I'm now branching out into other areas of biology and into popular science writing. I'll write here about science that happens in landscapes, particularly farmland, and about science involving interspecific interactions. Datasets and statistics get my attention. Exactly where this blog will lead? That's a journey that I'm on and I hope you'll come with me.
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One Response to Trade between Europe and the United States

  1. Pingback: Antibiotics to make livestock grow | Science on the Land

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