Tag Archives: behaviour

Harvard study links pesticides to bee deaths

Colony Collapse Disorder (CCD) in honeybees (Apis mellifera) can be linked with low-dose insecticides. Philip Case at the UK magazine Farmers Weekly tells us about research in the States, where CCD is a huge problem. This is a serious matter … Continue reading

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Leave Them Bee- The Honeybees That Fearfully Avoid Hornets

argylesock says… Don’t scare the bees! We need pollinators for crops and wild plants. There are many pollinating insects but one of those is the European honeybee (Apis mellifera). There are many kinds of hornet too, including the Asian hornet … Continue reading

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Neonicotioids V: Insecticides and Bad Behavior

Originally posted on Living With Insects Blog:
Honey Bee Hives The effects of insecticides on insects have been extensively studied. At high enough doses, insects will die. At lower doses, insects may survive, but present physiological and behavioral changes. Insecticides…

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Badger sleeping habits could help target TB control

At Exeter University, scientists have found evidence that badgers sleeping in ‘outlying’ setts are more likely than other badgers to carry bovine tuberculosis. This is serious research but I just have to call these badgers ‘dirty stop-outs’.

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Honeybees and Varroa mites

I’m grateful to my fellow blogger narhvalur for pointing out this article about how the honey bee (Apis mellifera) seems to fight back against the Varroa mite (Varroa destructor). V. destructor lives down to its scary name. It’s associated with … Continue reading

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Learning from other organisms

If something works, it’s probably been developed already by natural selection. So we humans can learn from other organisms. My fellow blogger Anthropogen drew my attention to bee-brained robots. I like it that these tiny robots might prove useful as … Continue reading

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Breeding the honeybee?

In recent years, hives of the honeybee (Apis mellifera) have been devastated in the States, European countries and Japan by Colony Collapse Disorder (CCD). It’s a serious matter because we need bees to pollinate crops and wild plants. CCD isn’t … Continue reading

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Ducks’ welfare on the farm

If you buy animal products to eat, in Britain you can look for the Royal Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals (RSPCA)’s Freedom Food logo. I do. It’s on meat and also on other animal products. Sometimes there’s … Continue reading

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Like a duck to water

Today my fellow bloggers at Animal Connection drew attention to cruelty on British duck farms. If, like me, you enjoy eating duck – even if you never eat it – you might want to sign a petition with the Royal … Continue reading

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Migrating geese avoid windfarms

There’s evidence that pink-footed geese change their flight patterns to avoid offshore wind turbines near Britain. I’m grateful to another WP blogger, Ann Novek, for telling me about this.

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