Tag Archives: harvest

Insects could be the future of food

In many cultures, insects are delicacies. Mostly people are eating beetles (Coleoptera) and caterpillars (Lepidoptera). People also eat bees, wasps and ants (Hymenoptera), cicadas (Hemiptera), locusts and crickets (Orthoptera), dragonflies (Odonata) and flies (Diptera). Eating insects is called entomophagy. Those … Continue reading

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Wageningen researchers find yields from new crop varieties continue to increase

Originally posted on AgScience:
New varieties continue to yield more than their predecessors, according to research into varieties of winter wheat, spring barley, potatoes grown for starch and sugar beet which have been introduced in the Netherlands by plant breeding…

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A decade of extremes

The World Meteorological Organization (WMO) tells us that the first decade of the 21st century was the warmest for both hemispheres and for both land and ocean temperatures since measurements began in 1850. As you know, I think the evidence … Continue reading

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Crop of the month: Asparagus

The moon was full two weeks ago, so I’m late writing about harvest this month. You can see other posts in this series by following my ‘harvest’ tag. This month, let’s admire asparagus. I’d like to tell you that the … Continue reading

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Celebrating carrots (even if they don’t give you night vision)

Originally posted on Sciencelens:
Today, 4 April 2013, is the 10th celebration of International Carrot Day, the day to dress in orange and celebrate the wholesome goodness of these versatile and delicious orange vegetables. I wonder whether Carrot Day being…

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Crop of the month: Rhubarb

The Moon was full three nights ago so I’m thinking about harvest. You can see other posts in this series by following my ‘harvest’ tag. This month, let’s admire rhubarb. I’ve just finished eating this year’s first cut of rhubarb … Continue reading

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Threshing rice in sub-Saharan Africa

When you’ve grown rice, you have to thresh out the grain. Threshing manually is hard work and wasteful. So rice farmers in sub-Saharan Africa are glad to have a good threshing machine. AfricaRice and the European Initiative for Agricultural Research … Continue reading

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The extraordinary diversity of Brassica oleracea

Originally posted on The Botanist in the Kitchen:
Before the caterpillars attacked: Red Russian kale seedlings Jeanne turns her frustration with caterpillars in her garden into an exploration of the botany behind an extraordinary species:  Brassica oleracea. White cabbage butterflies…

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Crop of the month: Leek

The moon was full last night so I’m thinking about harvest. You can see other posts in this series by following my ‘harvest’ tag. This month, let’s admire the leek. At this time of year in Britain the leek (Allium … Continue reading

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How the food we eat can connect kids to nature

argylesock says… Every year in season, we’d go to the Pick Your Own farm. Then we’d eat strawberries with cream, my mother would make jam and pies… you never forget something like that.

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