Not just bad for bees: Neonic pesticides could damage babies’ brains

argylesock says… Another neonic! I hadn’t heard of acetamiprid until now but our European Food Safety Authority (EFSA) says that it’s likely to be a hazard to unborn babies and young children. Perhaps this is another neonic that should be banned. Alongside imidacloprid and the other two which are currently under a temporary ban in Europe. Here’s the EFSA report.

[Edit] Here’s a newspaper report about the threat to babies from acetamiprid and imidacloprid

Grist

The fruit and vegetables that Americans bring home and cook up for their families are often laced with pest-killing chemicals known as acetamiprid and imidacloprid, members of the neonicotinoid class.

That sounds gross. Even grosser than these nearly unpronounceable chemical names are new findings out of Europe that the compounds may stunt the development of brains in fetuses and young children.

The discovery, by scientists working with rats for the European Food Safety Authority, has led to calls in Europe to further restrict the use of the neonic pesticides. From a press release put out by the authority:

The [Plant Protection Products and their Residues] Panel found that acetamiprid and imidacloprid may adversely affect the development of neurons and brain structures associated with functions such as learning and memory. It concluded that some current guidance levels for acceptable exposure to acetamiprid and imidacloprid may not be protective enough to safeguard against…

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About argylesock

I wrote a PhD about veterinary parasitology so that's the starting point for this blog. But I'm now branching out into other areas of biology and into popular science writing. I'll write here about science that happens in landscapes, particularly farmland, and about science involving interspecific interactions. Datasets and statistics get my attention. Exactly where this blog will lead? That's a journey that I'm on and I hope you'll come with me.
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